Hardware

iPhone 14 Pro is NOT so easy to repair

Yesterday it was reported how iFixit found Apple’s new iPhone 14 was easier to repair than previous generation models. It seems however that ease does not apply to the premium iPhone 14 Pro version. So much for the iPhone 14’s surprisingly repairable design extending across the lineup. iFixit has completed a teardown of the iPhone 14 Pro Max, and the easier-to-fix internals haven’t carried over. Break the back glass and you’ll have a harder time repairing it yourself — or an expensive ($549 in the US) Apple Store visit if your device is out of warranty. While Apple never said the Pro models would receive…

Read More

iPhone 14 is easier to repair

Apple (and other smart phone makers) are facing pressure from federal (such as The EU) and state governments to make their devices last longer and easier to repair. It appears Apple is already ahead of the curve as iFixit suggest this is the most repairable iPhone model in several years. Apple acknowledged that the iPhone 14 was designed to be easier to repair, but it might have undersold that upgrade. iFixit has finished a teardown of this year’s base iPhone, and it’s clear that the device was reworked from the ground up with do-it-yourself fixes in mind. The back glass is easier and cheaper…

Read More

Intel Dropping Pentium and Celeron Names

Way back in 1993 Intel introduce the Pentium Processor which was the next version of Intel’s x86 architecture-compatible microprocessors (it was the successor to the 486 processor). Intel released future generations of its flagship processor (including Pentium II and Pentium III) in the years following.  By 2006 the ‘Intel Core’ line had become the new flagship processors for Intel. Pentium processor were still being made for low power devices and entry level desktops. Intel’s Celeron processor was introduced in 1998 based of the Pentium II processor. However, Celeron were lower end processors Celeron often with less cache or intentionally disabled…

Read More

Testing shows SSDs are now more reliable than hard drives

This should come as to no surprise given SSDs (Solid State Drive) don’t have any moving mechanical parts which could fail such as those in the ‘old school’ Hard Disk Drives (HDDs). While SSDs do have a finite number of reads/writes, with an average lifespan of 10-years the SSD is likely to outlast the device which it is installed within. As speedy solid-state drives began to rise as a realistic alternative to the decades-old hard drive for consumers, early adopters worried that their new SSDs would fail faster and more frequently. But that might not be the case now, if…

Read More

HP Inc. to Settle with EU Printer Customers over Dynamic Security Issues

HP promoted their Dynamic Security System to their customers as a way to “upgrade their experience and maintain the integrity of its printing systems.” Instead many consumers found their Internet connected HP printers turned into an expensive paper-weight when their devices refused to work. According to a US Class Action Lawsuit: In or around late October and early November, 2020, HP caused to be transmitted a firmware update containing malware designed to lock out then-compatible third-party supply cartridges. HP wrote, designed, and transmitted the firmware or a portion thereof solely for the purpose of disabling third-party supply cartridges, which were…

Read More

Volkswagen ID. Buzz (Electric) Microbus

Announced back in 2017, Volkswagen has released in Europe the long awaited electric version of the classic VW Type 2 or Bus. A US version will be released sometime in 2023. The primary (and at this time known) differences between the European and US versions of the Volkswagen ID. Buzz Microbus are primarily the wheelbase length and seating configuration. The European version is more of compact SUV with two rows of passenger seating and a (small) cargo area in the rear. The US version will be more like the original Type 2 or Bus with a longer wheel base allowing…

Read More

Intel shows off 80Gbps Thunderbolt

With the forthcoming USB 4 2.0 spec being announced earlier this month Thunderbolt users were wondering if Intel would followed suit. The answer appears to be yes  with a prototype 80Gbps Thunderbolt demo shown in Intel’s Israel facility. Intel is the key developer of Thunderbolt, which was co-developed with Apple. The I/O specification is the foundation of a small but growing ecosystem of Thunderbolt docks, which connect to a USB-C/Thunderbolt port on a PC and use the I/O bandwidth to connect to various peripherals, including displays and storage. Displays, not surprisingly, suck up the most bandwidth. The current Thunderbolt specification, known as…

Read More

iPhone 14 Battery Replacement $99

While the future iPhone 14 does not include a charging brick and the battery replacement is going to run you $99 ($30 more than previous generations) at least you battery is replaceable. Most Android phones after 2010 switched to a non-removable battery mainly to make the phones thinner (by not having a removable back cover). Despite the name, non-removable batteries are removable, but not very easily. Most consumers will need to purchase specials tools or take their device to a repair shop.. However, many Android owners may not be aware of this or don’t want to bother with the hassle and…

Read More

Brazil to Apple: You Can Not Sell The iPhone without a Charger

Almost two-year ago (October 23, 2020) Apple released the iPhone 12. The first iPhone not come packaged standard with ear buds and a charging brick. Apple’s justification for excluding these was for environmental reasons. Without these accessories Apple could use a smaller packaging with less of a carbon footprint. Sounds logical, especially since they also wouldn’t be manufacturing as many of the charging bricks and ear buds as well. However, you could say this would be the same as selling Electric Vehicles (EV) and not including the charging cable in the MSRP. Seems silly right…oh wait Tesla already did that…

Read More

USB4 Version 2.0 Announced

The USB Promoter Group announced USB4 Version2.0 on Thursday, a specification that will allow for up to 80Gbps to be transferred over the USB-C connector that is commonly in use on PCs and smartphones. The standard will be backwards compatible with USB4 Version 1.0, USB 3.2, USB 2.0, and Thunderbolt 3 — but not USB 1.0 or Thunderbolt 4. Until now, USB and Thunderbolt have basically co-existed in parallel worlds. Because of somewhat murky licensing issues, Intel-based laptops have used a Thunderbolt 3 or Thunderbolt 4 port and laptops powered by AMD’s Ryzen have used USB4. As we discussed in our USB4…

Read More